Life Moments By Design: It’s All In The Details

Above: Cranky father of the bride, George Banks goes at it with his daughter’s wedding planner Franck Eggelhoffer in the 1991 movie 'Father of the Bride' (Photo: Touchstone Pictures)
Above: Cranky father of the bride, George Banks goes at it with his daughter’s wedding planner Franck Eggelhoffer in the 1991 movie 'Father of the Bride' (Photo: Touchstone Pictures)

Remember the scene in the movie Father of the Bride when George Banks, played by Steve Martin meets his daughter’s wedding planner Franck Eggelhoffer, aka: Martin Short? Franck’s crazy accent was hysterical. But it was George, the epitome of all men, who stole our hearts. Granted George’s end game, regarding his involvement in the wedding day decision-making was more cost than design-oriented, but he had a vision. A misguided one to be clear, but still. The poor guy tried and you have to give him props for that. In the end though, Franck’s aesthetics won, George conceded defeat and the wedding details were left to the ladies.

Fast forward 14 years and times have changed. According to a recent survey by Wakefield Research on behalf of Best Buy, when it comes to party planning men no longer withdraw to the shadows of submission. A whopping 91 per cent of men and 92 per cent of grooms are getting into the game, determining the design details—whether it’s for a landmark birthday, an anniversary, a bro-dal shower (yes, this is a thing), a bachelor party or a wedding—ensuring every decision is a two-way street.

“A wedding is a pivotal moment in a man’s life,” affirms Matthew Cook, the founder and president of Matilyn Life Customized, in Toronto. “When you’re planning yours and all the parties leading up to it, your design choices become front and centre. They ultimately set the stage, representing your signature style as a couple.”

And with time, or rather a lack of it on their hands, these men are openly seeking advice for their custom-design concepts to help them stay up to date on trends, push the boundaries on tradition (buh bye anonymous drunken Vegas weekends; hello stylized cigar and brandy tasting with the boys) and create just the right amount of drama that will be remembered long after the last bottle of champers has run dry.

“Caring about the design details translates into how much you care about your guests,” adds Cook. “Plus, they enhance your style, your creativity and give you an added boost of confidence.”

Having a consistent and recognizable design theme is, after all, like stamping your party with your own personal brand. Plus, it lets you think outside the floral-centre-piece box and consider specialized, one-of-a-kind items instead, such as creating a customized crest with your last name or your initials, opting for invitations made out of fabric or outfitting your dance floor with a cool vinyl floor graphic. And the options don’t stop there. Crafting artwork for the venue, personalized messages on iridescent paper and can’t-be-bought-in-stores thank you cards have become the style equivalent to being the first man in your group to wear Audemars Piguet GMT Tourbillion watch, drive the new Ferrari 488 Spider and get a table at Wildair.

“These decor touches elevate your style quotient from good to extraordinary,” affirms Cook. As for the ladies, well, let’s just say they’re eternally grateful to now have a partner in crime.

George would be proud.

Adriana Ermter

Adriana Ermter

Adriana is an award-winning writer and editor. The former beauty director for FASHION magazine and editor-in-chief of Salon and of Childview magazines has hosted beauty videos for fashionmagazine.com, as well as contributed to Men’s FASHION, Chatelaine and chatelaine.com, Flare and flare.com, Huffington Post Canada, National Post, AmongMen.com, thekit.ca, iVillage.ca and thewhaleandtherose.com. She lives in Toronto with her very spoiled feline, Trixie-Belle, and a fantastically large perfume collection.

You may follow Adriana on Twitter: @AErmter and on Instagram: AdrianaErmter.

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