Remembering Prince: A Once In A Lifetime Talent

There is never going to be another Prince.

Last week, the world lost one of the greatest musical performers of off all-time when the man from Paisley Park passed away. While most point to Michael Jackson or Madonna as the best of the generation of entertainers that came to fame in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, Prince’s all-around contributions carry him to the top of the list.

Both were more popular globally and managed more record sales, but there were things Prince did that neither Madge or Michael did that makes up the difference and gives him the edge.

As detailed last week, Prince penned a bunch of hits for other people, something neither “The King of Pop” and the “Queen of Reinvention” did during their careers and that’s in addition to the impressive collection classics he performed himself. To this day, “Let’s Go Crazy” is a Top 10 Party Jam and if you haven’t listened to it at least once a day since “The Purple One” passed, what are you waiting for?

What really distinguished Prince from his contemporaries though is his overall musicianship and ability to cross genres over a career that spanned nearly four decades. Not only was he a hell of a singer and a great front man, but Prince was also unreal on the guitar and really damn good on the drums, bass, keyboards and synthesizers. He played almost every instrument on each of his first five albums, something neither Jackson or Madonna could ever claim, and was influential in the careers of acts like The Time, Sheila E and Vanity 6.

Then there is Purple Rain, his combo movie-album that remains the best music film of all-time and an electric album. The four-pack of singles – “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” “Purple Rain” and “I Would Die 4 U” – is an amazing quartet and despite some obvious cheesiness, the film holds up too, based largely on the outstanding performances and for teaching people about Lake Minnetonka.

Prince was one-of-a-kind – a trendsetter, a trailblazer, a true musical and creative genius. He cross boundaries, challenged ideas and marched to the beat of his own drum – a drum he was playing, of course. He inspired thousands, entertained millions and at one time or another, he made everyone dance or sing or tap out a rhythm on their steering wheel.

He was incredible and he will certainly be missed, though his music and influence will live on forever.

Rest in Peace.

E. Spencer Kyte

E. Spencer Kyte

E. Spencer Kyte is a freelance journalist based in Abbotsford, British Columbia, where he lives with his wife and dog. In addition to his work here, he writes about sports for Complex Canada and covers the UFC for various outlets. His mom also still tells him what to do on a regular basis, even though he’s nearly 40. He tweets from @spencerkyte.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>