Fall/Winter 2014 Menswear Trends From Toronto Fashion Week

Above: Fall/Winter 2014 menswear trends coming down the runway at World MasterCard Fashion Week in Toronto (Photos: George Pimentel)
Above: Fall/Winter 2014 menswear trends coming down the runway at World MasterCard Fashion Week in Toronto (Photos: George Pimentel)

Accountants have tax season, teachers have exam period and fashion lovers have fashion week. For five long days fashion enthusiasts experience an overflow of visual stimulation. As a fashion writer and researcher, all this information isn’t just arbitrary but rather raw data that needs to be critiqued, classified and analyzed. It’s quite the whirlwind, but with a little time and an acute eye it can be condensed into viable knowledge. Knowledge that buyers can use to make purchases, stylists can use to dress clients and readers (cue you) can use to learn about fashion and style.

Colours: Navy and Grey

Toronto FW14 Menswear Trends - Colours: Navy and Grey

[Above L-R: Runway looks from Christopher Bates, Gsus and Mackage (Photos: George Pimentel)]

Designers generally favor the application of cooler colours during the bitter months. With reason, there is a certain darkness during the fall and winter that is inspiring and should be embraced. And, to no surprise, this is exactly what Canadian designers did this past week. Be prepared for deep navy, dark greys and plenty of black.

Details: Large Lapels and Rolled Up Cuffs

Toronto FW14 Menswear Trends - Large Lapels and Rolled Up Cuffs

[Above L-R: Runway looks from Thomas Bálint (Photos: George Pimentel)]

It was once theorized that the hemline of a woman’s skirt signified the economic state of society; in prosperous times hemlines would rise, in financially difficult times hemlines would drop. Perhaps the same can be true for the size of lapels? Either way, we’re reaching a time where big lapels are coming and small ones are taking a rest. In addition to large lapels, designers decided to roll their pant cuffs giving off a carefree, biker-friendly vibe. Oh, and the beauty is, there’s no purchase necessary.

Key Items: Collarless Shirt and Trench

Toronto FW14 Menswear Trends - Collarless Shirt and Trench

[Above L-R: Runway looks from Thomas Bálint and Christopher Bates (Photos: George Pimentel)]

Two favourite key items on the runway included (1) the collarless button-up shirt and (2) the trench coat. The collarless shirt’s slight deviation from the norm surprisingly delivers a sharp impact. Quietly add to a blazer or jacket for an alternative spin. On the other hand, the trench coat is one of the more traditional menswear garments. In addition to its classic nature, it checks off utilitarian, flattering and masculine boxes. Pair both the button-up and trench together for extra style points.

Fabrics: Leather and Velvet

Toronto FW14 Menswear Trends - Fabrics: Leather and Velvet

[Above L-R: Runway looks from HD Homme, Mackage and Rudsak (Photos: George Pimentel)]

Include leather and velvet in your fabric selection next winter. Warm velvet draped the runway in blues, reds and even greens—thank you, HD Homme. As for leather, it too was spiced up. While colour stayed consistent, the fabric was employed for several clothing styles, including jackets, shirts and pants.

Grooming: High and Back Hair

Toronto FW14 Menswear Trends - Grooming: High and Back Hair

[Above: Runway look from Outclass (Photos: George Pimentel)]

An appreciation of high, slicked-back hair was witnessed in the tents. As male models walked down the runway it was a steady rhythm of up and back, up and back—yes, hair has a rhythm. So, if being extra prepared gratifies you, better start growing out those locks now.

Avatar

Julie Rubinger

Julie Rubinger is a Toronto-based fashion writer. With a Masters in Communication and Design from Ryerson’s School of Fashion, Julie writes for publications like Canadian Living and The Genteel. Amongst her writing, Julie also continues to work as a wardrobe stylist for la closette. For further information about Julie and her fashion theory-obsessed life, go to julierubinger.com or follow her on Twitter at: @julesrubinger

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>