48 Hours In Jamaica

Jamaica is an island that offers up more than spicy food, good rum and reggae. This Caribbean nation with a population of more than 2 million has long been the top spot for couples, families and friends looking to escape the hustle and bustle of life to kick island style. A short plane ride from Canada you’ll find yourself falling in love with the country and discover there are a ton of things to see and do here in 48 hours. From mouth-watering food to roots, rock and reggae you’ll be very tempted to extend your stay here into forever.

Where to stay

Landing in the Capital of Kingston? Check out the Courtleigh Hotel and Suites; a medium size property that has all the amenities of a big hotel (i.e.: free Wi-Fi, private gym, swimming pool, onsite restaurant, etc.) with a friendly boutique feel. It is situated on the main strip in New Kingston on busy Knutsford Boulevard making it the perfect place to jump in a cab and visit popular destinations in and around the capital such as the Bob Marley Museum, beaches and the Blue Mountains.

If your short stay is strictly dedicated to sand, surf and relaxation, then head straight to Golden Eye Hotel & Resort located 20 minutes outside of Ocho Rios on the island’s north coast. This 52 acre property was once home to Ian Fleming, the famous British author who penned the popular James Bond novels. Here you can really get away from it all and choose to stay in one of 11 cottages, six lagoon suites and even sleep in Fleming’s original villa. Oh and did we mention the private beaches on site, as well as spa and watersports available to guests? Yes, you’ll find it difficult to leave this place.

Where to eat

Hopefully, you fasted for a week prior to your trip to Jamaica because upon arrival you’ll want to sample all the delicious fare the island has to offer. The national dish is ackee and salt fish, but coming in at number two – and the most well-known – would be jerk. Jamaica’s Jerk Trail takes you to 22 succulent and spicy spots, from the west to east coast of the island. Popular jerk joints like Scotchie’s and Bourbon Beach in Negril will set your taste buds on fire but also have you clamouring for more to eat. Other must-visit culinary spots are Rick’s Café in Negril, known for its diverse menu, world famous sunsets and cliff diving spectacles.

What to do

Apart from jerk, Jamaica is also known for producing coffee in its legendary Blue Mountains, which considered one of the most sought-after coffees in the world. Java junkies don’t want to miss the chance to travel up the mountains’ winding roads to tour its coffee plantations. Check out the Craighton Coffee Estate, they offer 20-30 minute tours for approximately $20 by appointment.

While several hundred metres above sea level you might as well kick up your island adventures by hoping on two wheels. Biking down the Blue Mountains is an exhilarating experience and a great way to take-in the beautiful scenery. Blue Mountain Bicycle Tours offers a leisurely downhill ride with tons of photo ops. On the other hand, daredevils can gear up with Single Track Jamaica who will take you on a rugged and memorable ride into the bush.

Last, but certainly not least, on your must-see and do list in Jamaica is the Bob Marley Museum. Located at 56 Hope Road in Kingston, visitors can take a guided museum tour, which takes 1 hour and 15 minutes, and learn about the reggae legend’s life and times.

For more information go to: http://www.visitjamaica.com

Kimberly Lyn

Kimberly Lyn

Kimberly Lyn is a freelance writer based in Toronto. Her worked has appeared on StyleList Canada, 29 Secrets and GlobalNews.ca. She is also founder of the highly successful fashion blog The Souls of My Shoes, where she provides insights and thoughts on this world with a concentration on footwear. Find her at www.thesoulsofmyshoes.com and on Twitter @kimberly_lyn.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>