What Your Quiff Reveals About You

Celebrity quiff inspiration from: James Dean, Conan O'Brien, Ryan Gosling and Justin Timberlake
Celebrity quiff inspiration from: James Dean, Conan O'Brien, Ryan Gosling and Justin Timberlake

Ever since celebrities like Elvis Presley and James Dean entered the scene, quiffs have received excellent feedback. More recently, due to the influx of hipster culture, men have begun to incorporate the trend into their image. But every man doesn’t approach the style with the same enthusiasm. Some men prefer a high wave, others prefer closer to the head; some men feel the need to apply generous amounts of grease, while others say no to product use. 

Four chief dimensions to the construction of the quiff have been established. Interestingly, each element illustrates something distinctive about the wearer. Curious?

Dimension 1: Height

Height refers to the elevation of the man’s wave. Despite voluminous hair’s stereotypical association with women, the big hair look instantly offers a statement of masculinity. Still, different heights suggest different characters. A man with a tall quiff (>2 inches) can suggest either extreme confidence or insecurity—think Conan O’Brian. Due to this ambiguity, be weary of severe hair heights for first interviews or first dates. Lower waves (<2 inches) are a more liberal approach to the trend. This look humbly illustrates that you appreciate good style and aren’t afraid to try.

Dimension 2: Part

In elementary terms, there are two quiff parts: the “no part” or the “side part.” Critics have claimed that the specific location of the side part; i.e., left or right, can convey a great deal of information about one’s personality. For now though, we’re going to keep it simple. The no part’s slicked back shape demonstrates an assertive man who doesn’t spend his time being intimidated. A side part communicates a more cerebral, analytical guy; just like he’s particular about his part, he’s particular about his life decisions.

Dimension 3: Product

Product. It really takes a coiffure from minimal to high fashion. A dry hair quiff implies a soft, modest panache. Perhaps your dad or exceptionally friendly neighbour sports this no fuss, product-free hair. On the other hand, a greased up texture has a more serious, detailed impression. Seen on the runway and at the local bar, heavy grease isn’t indicative of what you do, but rather who you are—a man of style.

Dimension 4: Cut

Probably the most dramatic dimension, a cut is critical to the essence of this hair trend. With the quiff, there are two leading cuts: grown out sides or shaved sides. They’re two completely different designs, for two completely different fellows. Grown out sides welcomes strangers with open arms. It signifies a warm, social statement that’s a good guest at any party. Shaved sides have a sharp disposition. It may not be the most approachable vibe, but if you become friends with this chap you’ll want him to stick around.

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Julie Rubinger

Julie Rubinger is a Toronto-based fashion writer. With a Masters in Communication and Design from Ryerson’s School of Fashion, Julie writes for publications like Canadian Living and The Genteel. Amongst her writing, Julie also continues to work as a wardrobe stylist for la closette. For further information about Julie and her fashion theory-obsessed life, go to julierubinger.com or follow her on Twitter at: @julesrubinger

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